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Proceedings Paper

Are the satellite-observed narrow, streaky chlorophyll filaments locally intensified by the submesoscale processes?
Author(s): Igor Shulman; Bradley Penta; James Richman; Gregg Jacobs; Stephanie Anderson; Peter Sakalaukus
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Paper Abstract

Based on observations and modeling studies we have evaluated the impact of submesoscale processes on the development and intensification of offshore narrow (5-10km wide) phytoplankton filaments during summer time in the Monterey Bay, CA. We have demonstrated that, submesoscale processes (surface frontogenesis and nonlinear Ekman transport) lead to the development of very productive phytoplankton patches along the edges between the cold jet and warm anticyclonic eddy. Our results illustrate that during persistent upwelling favorable winds, submesoscale processes can modulate the development and intensification of offshore narrow (5-10km wide) phytoplankton filaments. These processes can incubate the phytoplankton population offshore (as for example, bioluminescent dinoflagellates during August 2003). These offshore phytoplankton filaments can migrate onshore during relaxed winds following the upwelling, and be an additional source of phytoplankton bloom development in and around Monterey Bay. Therefore, the discussed offshore phytoplankton filaments may be a factor in the Bay ecosystem health, as for example, in the development of such events as harmful algae blooms (HABs). All these emphasize the importance of further observational and modeling studies of these submesoscale processes which impact the development and intensification of offshore phytoplankton filaments.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 May 2015
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 9459, Ocean Sensing and Monitoring VII, 94590K (19 May 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2177569
Show Author Affiliations
Igor Shulman, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)
Bradley Penta, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)
James Richman, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)
Gregg Jacobs, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)
Stephanie Anderson, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)
Peter Sakalaukus, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9459:
Ocean Sensing and Monitoring VII
Weilin W. Hou; Robert A. Arnone, Editor(s)

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