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Proceedings Paper

Optical design for the Rosetta wide-angle camera
Author(s): Roberto Ragazzoni; Giampiero Naletto; Cesare Barbieri; Giuseppe Tondello
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Paper Abstract

Rosetta is a cornerstone mission of ESA to have a roundez-vous with a periodic comet, namely Wirtanen P/1991 XVI. A basic instrument of its payload is an imaging system to observe this object both with a narrow and wide angle camera: during the approach phase, Rosetta will orbit around the comet and the two cameras will map the surface of the comet nucleus and the jets. In this paper a possible design for the wide angle camera is described: this solution adopts an all-reflecting, unobstructed three mirror configuration that permits to have a approximately equals 19 degrees X 17 degrees field of view with a F/3.2 aperture, with an optical quality of better than 80% geometrical encircled energy inside 150 microradians. The detector is a 2048 X 2048, 12 X 12 micrometers 2 pixel CCD, possibly coated with a suitable fluorescent layer to be sensitive also in the ultraviolet spectral region (above 120 nm). We also describe a possible option, namely to have an add-on spectroscopic channel for obtaining spectral information in the UV region from 120 nm to 240 nm, along a slit keeping a spectral resolution of R approximately equals 500 over at least two degrees.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 June 1995
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2478, Space Telescopes and Instruments, (2 June 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.210932
Show Author Affiliations
Roberto Ragazzoni, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova and CISAS (Italy)
Giampiero Naletto, CISAS and Univ. di Padova (Italy)
Cesare Barbieri, CISAS and Univ. di Padova (Italy)
Giuseppe Tondello, CISAS and Univ. di Padova (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2478:
Space Telescopes and Instruments
Pierre Y. Bely; James B. Breckinridge, Editor(s)

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