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Proceedings Paper

Infrared imaging spectroradiometer program overview
Author(s): Ronald J. Rapp; Henry I. Register
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Paper Abstract

The Department of Defense, through the US Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Armament Directorate is sponsoring the development of two types of IR imaging spectroradiometers (project name: IRIS) to measure the spatial/spectral characteristics of various military targets. Design and analysis of several technical approaches were conducted during an initial phase of the program. The technical approaches investigated included: a dispersive imaging spectrometer design utilizing a fiber-optic reformatter (contractor: ERIM); an imaging acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) design (contractor: Westinghouse); a spatial/spectral Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer (contractor: Bomem Inc./Canada); a spatially modulated imaging fourier transform spectrometer (contractor: Daedalus Enterprises); an imaging Fabry-Perot design (contractor: Physical Sciences Inc.). Two of these designs were selected for brass board prototype fabrication. An FTIR prototype being built by Bomem Inc., offers an instrument with high sensitivity and high spectral resolution with modest spatial performance. An imaging Fabry-Perot prototype being built by Physical Sciences Inc., offers high spatial resolution with moderate sensitivity and spectral resolution.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 June 1995
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 2480, Imaging Spectrometry, (12 June 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.210886
Show Author Affiliations
Ronald J. Rapp, Air Force Wright Lab. (United States)
Henry I. Register, Science Applications International Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2480:
Imaging Spectrometry
Michael R. Descour; Jonathan Martin Mooney; David L. Perry; Luanna R. Illing, Editor(s)

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