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Proceedings Paper

Satellite surface material composition from synthetic spectra
Author(s): Eugene L. Caudill; Michael C. Roggemann; Byron M. Welch; Steven K. Rogers
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Paper Abstract

Optical techniques for space object identification have been a topic of research for several decades. Imaging techniques have been widely examined for this problem. However, it has been shown that high spatial resolution cannot always be obtained due to atmospheric turbulence. Spectral measurements are of interest to determine the material content when images cannot be obtained. In this paper spectra obtained from a Fourier transform spectrometer are used to identify materials using pattern recognition-based techniques. The signal-to-noise ratio of the Sagnac-type interferometer is derived, and the errors in material identification and abundance estimation that arise from using the measured spectra to estimate these quantities are studied. Fisher discriminants and multi-layer perceptrons were used to identify materials, and a constrained least squares technique was used to estimate abundances. Results for material identification and abundance estimation are presented as a function of signal-to-noise ratio.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 June 1995
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2469, Targets and Backgrounds: Characterization and Representation, (2 June 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.210602
Show Author Affiliations
Eugene L. Caudill, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)
Michael C. Roggemann, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)
Byron M. Welch, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)
Steven K. Rogers, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2469:
Targets and Backgrounds: Characterization and Representation
Wendell R. Watkins; Dieter Clement, Editor(s)

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