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Proceedings Paper

Phase-resolved reflectance spectroscopy on layered turbid media
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Paper Abstract

In this study, we investigate the influence of layered tissue structures on the phase-resolved reflectance. As a particular example, we consider the affect of the skin, skull, and meninges on noninvasive blood oxygenation determination of the brain. In this case, it's important to know how accurate one can measure the absorption coefficient of the brain through the enclosing layers of different tissues. Experiments were performed on layered gelatin tissue phantoms and the results compared to diffusion theory. It is shown that when a high absorbing medium is placed on top of a low absorbing medium, the absorption coefficient of the lower layer is accessible. In the inverse case, where a low absorbing medium is placed on top of a high absorbing medium, the absorption coefficient of the underlying medium can only be determined if the differences in the absorption coefficient are small, or the top layer is very thin. Investigations on almost absorption and scattering free layers, like the cerebral fluid filled arachnoid, reveal that the determination of the absorption coefficient is barely affected by these kinds of structures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 May 1995
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 2389, Optical Tomography, Photon Migration, and Spectroscopy of Tissue and Model Media: Theory, Human Studies, and Instrumentation, (30 May 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.209974
Show Author Affiliations
Andreas H. Hielscher, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. and Rice Univ. (United States)
Hanli Liu, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Britton Chance, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Frank K. Tittel, Rice Univ. (United States)
Steven L. Jacques, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2389:
Optical Tomography, Photon Migration, and Spectroscopy of Tissue and Model Media: Theory, Human Studies, and Instrumentation
Britton Chance; Robert R. Alfano, Editor(s)

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