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Proceedings Paper

First-order model for computation of laser-induced breakdown thresholds in condensed media
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Paper Abstract

An analytic, first-order model has been developed to calculate irradiance thresholds for laser-induced breakdown (LIB) in condensed media, including fluids and ocular media. The model is derived from the simple rate equation formalism of Shen for cascade breakdown in solids and from the theory of multiphoton ionization in condensed media developed by Keldysh. Analytic expressions have been obtained for the irradiance thresholds corresponding to multiphoton breakdown, to cascade breakdown, and to initiation of cascade breakdown by multiphoton ionization of seed electrons (multiphoton initiation threshold). The model has been incorporated into a computer code and code results compared to experimentally measured irradiance thresholds for breakdown of ocular media, saline, and water by nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond laser pulses in the visible and near-infrared. Theoretical values match experiment to within a factor of 2 or better, over a range of pulsewidths spanning five orders of magnitude, a reasonably good match for a first order model.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 May 1995
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2391, Laser-Tissue Interaction VI, (22 May 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.209922
Show Author Affiliations
Paul K. Kennedy, Air Force Armstrong Lab. (United States)
Stephen A. Boppart, Air Force Armstrong Lab. (United States)
Daniel X. Hammer, Air Force Armstrong Lab. (United States)
Benjamin A. Rockwell, Air Force Armstrong Lab. (United States)
Gary D. Noojin, The Analytical Sciences Corp. (United States)
William P. Roach, Air Force Armstrong Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2391:
Laser-Tissue Interaction VI
Steven L. Jacques, Editor(s)

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