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Proceedings Paper

EUV tools: hydrogen gas purification and recovery strategies
Author(s): Cristian Landoni; Marco Succi; Chuck Applegarth; Sarah Riddle Vogt
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Paper Abstract

The technological challenges that have been overcome to make extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) a reality have been enormous1. This vacuum driven technology poses significant purity challenges for the gases employed for purging and cleaning the scanner EUV chamber and source. Hydrogen, nitrogen, argon and ultra-high purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA) are the most common gases utilized at the scanner and source level. Purity requirements are tighter than for previous technology node tools. In addition, specifically for hydrogen, EUV tool users are facing not only gas purity challenges but also the need for safe disposal of the hydrogen at the tool outlet. Recovery, reuse or recycling strategies could mitigate the disposal process and reduce the overall tool cost of operation. This paper will review the types of purification technologies that are currently available to generate high purity hydrogen suitable for EUV applications. Advantages and disadvantages of each purification technology will be presented. Guidelines on how to select the most appropriate technology for each application and experimental conditions will be presented. A discussion of the most common approaches utilized at the facility level to operate EUV tools along with possible hydrogen recovery strategies will also be reported.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 April 2015
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 9424, Metrology, Inspection, and Process Control for Microlithography XXIX, 94242O (10 April 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2085967
Show Author Affiliations
Cristian Landoni, SAES Getters S.p.A. (Italy)
Marco Succi, SAES Getters S.p.A. (Italy)
Chuck Applegarth, SAES Pure Gas, Inc. (United States)
Sarah Riddle Vogt, SAES Pure Gas, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9424:
Metrology, Inspection, and Process Control for Microlithography XXIX
Jason P. Cain; Martha I. Sanchez, Editor(s)

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