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Proceedings Paper

Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters
Author(s): Stewart Sherrit; Hyeong Jae Lee; Phillip Walkemeyer; Tyler Winn; Luis Phillipe Tosi; Tim Colonius
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Paper Abstract

Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 April 2015
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 9435, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015, 943507 (3 April 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2084574
Show Author Affiliations
Stewart Sherrit, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Hyeong Jae Lee, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Phillip Walkemeyer, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Tyler Winn, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Luis Phillipe Tosi, California Institute of Technology (United States)
Tim Colonius, California Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9435:
Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015
Jerome P. Lynch, Editor(s)

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