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Proceedings Paper

Simulating the x-ray image contrast to setup techniques with desired flaw detectability
Author(s): Ajay M. Koshti
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Paper Abstract

The paper provides simulation data of previous work by the author in developing a model for estimating detectability of crack-like flaws in radiography. The methodology is developed to help in implementation of NASA Special x-ray radiography qualification, but is generically applicable to radiography. The paper describes a method for characterizing the detector resolution. Applicability of ASTM E 2737 resolution requirements to the model are also discussed. The paper describes a model for simulating the detector resolution. A computer calculator application, discussed here, also performs predicted contrast and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. Results of various simulation runs in calculating x-ray flaw size parameter and image contrast for varying input parameters such as crack depth, crack width, part thickness, x-ray angle, part-to-detector distance, part-to-source distance, source sizes, and detector sensitivity and resolution are given as 3D surfaces. These results demonstrate effect of the input parameters on the flaw size parameter and the simulated image contrast of the crack. These simulations demonstrate utility of the flaw size parameter model in setting up x-ray techniques that provide desired flaw detectability in radiography. The method is applicable to film radiography, computed radiography, and digital radiography.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 2015
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 9437, Structural Health Monitoring and Inspection of Advanced Materials, Aerospace, and Civil Infrastructure 2015, 94370W (1 April 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2083225
Show Author Affiliations
Ajay M. Koshti, NASA Johnson Space Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9437:
Structural Health Monitoring and Inspection of Advanced Materials, Aerospace, and Civil Infrastructure 2015
Peter J. Shull, Editor(s)

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