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Proceedings Paper

Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk
Author(s): Shandong Wu; Brenda F. Kurland; Wendie A. Berg; Margarita L. Zuley; Rachel C. Jankowitz; Jules Sumkin; David Gur
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Paper Abstract

Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 March 2015
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 9414, Medical Imaging 2015: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, 94140M (20 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2082466
Show Author Affiliations
Shandong Wu, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Brenda F. Kurland, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Wendie A. Berg, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital of Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. (United States)
Margarita L. Zuley, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital of Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. (United States)
Rachel C. Jankowitz, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital of Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. (United States)
Jules Sumkin, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital of Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. (United States)
David Gur, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9414:
Medical Imaging 2015: Computer-Aided Diagnosis
Lubomir M. Hadjiiski; Georgia D. Tourassi, Editor(s)

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