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Proceedings Paper

Optical microangiography reveals collateral blood perfusion dynamics in mouse cerebral cortex after focal stroke
Author(s): Utku Baran; Yuandong Li; Ruikang K. Wang
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Paper Abstract

Arteriolo-arteriolar anastomosis’s role in regulating blood perfusion through penetrating arterioles during stroke is yet to be discovered. We apply ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate vessel diameter and red blood cell velocity changes in large number of pial and penetrating arterioles in relation with arteriolo-arteriolar anastomosis (AAA) during and after focal stroke. Thanks to the high sensitivity of UHS-OMAG, we were able to image pial microvasculature up to capillary level through a cranial window (9 mm2), and DOMAG provided clear image of penetrating arterioles up to 500μm depth. Results showed that penetrating arterioles close to a strong AAA connection dilate whereas penetrating arterioles constrict significantly in weaker AAA regions. These results suggest that AAA plays a major role in active regulation of the pial arterioles, and weaker AAA connections lead to poor blood perfusion to penumbra through penetrating arterioles.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 March 2015
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 9312, Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XIX, 93121A (2 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2082311
Show Author Affiliations
Utku Baran, Univ. of Washington (United States)
Yuandong Li, Univ. of Washington (United States)
Ruikang K. Wang, Univ. of Washington (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9312:
Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XIX
James G. Fujimoto; Joseph A. Izatt; Valery V. Tuchin, Editor(s)

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