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Proceedings Paper

Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery
Author(s): Shellie S. Knights-Mitchell; Marek Romanowski
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Paper Abstract

Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 March 2015
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 9338, Colloidal Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications X, 93381D (12 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2080485
Show Author Affiliations
Shellie S. Knights-Mitchell, Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Marek Romanowski, Univ. of Arizona (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9338:
Colloidal Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications X
Wolfgang J. Parak; Marek Osinski; Xing-Jie Liang, Editor(s)

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