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Proceedings Paper

An empirical approach to estimate near-infra-red photon propagation and optically induced drug release in brain tissues
Author(s): Akshay Prabhu Verleker; Qianqian Fang; Mi-Ran Choi; Susan Clare; Keith M. Stantz
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Paper Abstract

The purpose of this study is to develop an alternate empirical approach to estimate near-infra-red (NIR) photon propagation and quantify optically induced drug release in brain metastasis, without relying on computationally expensive Monte Carlo techniques (gold standard). Targeted drug delivery with optically induced drug release is a noninvasive means to treat cancers and metastasis. This study is part of a larger project to treat brain metastasis by delivering lapatinib-drug-nanocomplexes and activating NIR-induced drug release. The empirical model was developed using a weighted approach to estimate photon scattering in tissues and calibrated using a GPU based 3D Monte Carlo. The empirical model was developed and tested against Monte Carlo in optical brain phantoms for pencil beams (width 1mm) and broad beams (width 10mm). The empirical algorithm was tested against the Monte Carlo for different albedos along with diffusion equation and in simulated brain phantoms resembling white-matter (μs’=8.25mm-1, μa=0.005mm-1) and gray-matter (μs’=2.45mm-1, μa=0.035mm-1) at wavelength 800nm. The goodness of fit between the two models was determined using coefficient of determination (R-squared analysis). Preliminary results show the Empirical algorithm matches Monte Carlo simulated fluence over a wide range of albedo (0.7 to 0.99), while the diffusion equation fails for lower albedo. The photon fluence generated by empirical code matched the Monte Carlo in homogeneous phantoms (R2=0.99). While GPU based Monte Carlo achieved 300X acceleration compared to earlier CPU based models, the empirical code is 700X faster than the Monte Carlo for a typical super-Gaussian laser beam.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 March 2015
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 9308, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XXIV, 93080T (2 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2079991
Show Author Affiliations
Akshay Prabhu Verleker, Purdue Univ. School of Health Sciences (United States)
Qianqian Fang, Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging, Harvard Medical School (United States)
Mi-Ran Choi, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Univ. (United States)
Susan Clare, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Univ. (United States)
Keith M. Stantz, Purdue Univ. School of Health Sciences (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9308:
Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XXIV
David H. Kessel; Tayyaba Hasan, Editor(s)

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