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Proceedings Paper

Improving the signal analysis for in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry
Author(s): Zhenyu Niu; Ping Yang; Dan Wei; Shuo Tang; Xunbin Wei
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Paper Abstract

At early stage of cancer, a small number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear in the blood circulation. Thus, early detection of malignant circulating tumor cells has great significance for timely treatment to reduce the cancer death rate. We have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of CTCs and record the signals from target cells. Information of target cells which is helpful to the early therapy would be obtained through analyzing and processing the signals. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The PAFC technique can detect signals from circulating tumor cells or other particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 March 2015
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 9324, Biophotonics and Immune Responses X, 932413 (10 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2079956
Show Author Affiliations
Zhenyu Niu, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Ping Yang, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Dan Wei, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Shuo Tang, Univ. of British Columbia (Canada)
Xunbin Wei, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9324:
Biophotonics and Immune Responses X
Wei R. Chen, Editor(s)

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