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Proceedings Paper

Effects of surface chemistry on the optical properties and cellular interaction of lanthanide-based nanoparticles
Author(s): Francisco J. Pedraza; Julio C. Avalos; Lawrence C. Mimun; Brian G. Yust; Andrew Tsin; Dhiraj Kumar Sardar
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Paper Abstract

Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) such as KYb2F7:Tm3+ potential in biomedical applications due to their ability to absorb and emit within the biological window, where near infrared light is less attenuated by soft tissue. This results in less tissue damage and deeper tissue penetration making it a viable candidate in biological imaging. Another big factor in determining their ability to perform in a biological setting is the surface chemistry. Biocompatible coatings, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), pluronic and folic acid are commonly used because they pose several advantages such as ease of functionalization, better dispersion, and higher cellular uptake. To study the effects of the NP surface chemistry, KYb2F7:Tm3+ a solvothermal method using PEG, PVP, pluronic acid, and folic acid as a capping agent, followed by thorough optical characterizations. Optical changes were thoroughly studied and compared using absorption, emission, and quantum yield data. Cell viability was obtained by treating Rhesus Monkey Retinal Endothelial cells (RhREC) with KYb2F7:Tm3+ and counting viable cells following a 24 hour uptake period. The work presented will compare the optical properties and toxicity dependency on the surface chemistry on KYb2F7:Tm3+. The results will also indicate that KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanoparticles are viable candidates for various biomedical applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 March 2015
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 9339, Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications VII, 93390A (12 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2079943
Show Author Affiliations
Francisco J. Pedraza, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States)
Julio C. Avalos, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States)
Lawrence C. Mimun, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States)
Brian G. Yust, The Univ. of Texas-Pan American (United States)
Andrew Tsin, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States)
Dhiraj Kumar Sardar, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9339:
Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications VII
Samuel Achilefu; Ramesh Raghavachari, Editor(s)

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