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Proceedings Paper

Translational cancer vaccine: from mouse to human to cat
Author(s): Richard Levenson
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Paper Abstract

Acanthomatous ameloblastoma is a locally invasive tumor arising in the gingiva that can progress rapidly, invade and destroy bone. If the lesion involves the upper jaw, surgical excision may not be possible and while local control is imperative, other therapies have not been fully evaluated. The primary author’s personal cat, Gabriella, developed this tumor, with gingival masses around teeth in the upper jaw and evidence of widespread bony destruction of the hard palate. Because of his involvement with Immunophotonics Inc. as an advisor, the author was aware of an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that is currently under development by the company. One session was performed in a veterinary clinic in Arkansas, and two follow-up sessions at the small animal hospital at the UC Davis veterinary school. No other therapy was provided. As of this writing, 3+ years after first treatment and 3 years, 4 months after presentation, Gabriella is well, with no evidence of disease.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 March 2015
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 9324, Biophotonics and Immune Responses X, 93240C (9 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2079538
Show Author Affiliations
Richard Levenson, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9324:
Biophotonics and Immune Responses X
Wei R. Chen, Editor(s)

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