Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

A novel platform for minimally invasive delivery of cellular therapy as a thin layer across the subretina for treatment of retinal degeneration
Author(s): Ygal Rotenstreich; Adi Tzameret; Sapir E. Kalish; Michael Belkin; Amilia Meir; Avraham J. Treves; Arnon Nagler; Ifat Sher
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Incurable retinal degenerations affect millions worldwide. Stem cell transplantation rescued visual functions in animal models of retinal degeneration. In those studies cells were transplanted in subretinal "blebs", limited number of cells could be injected and photoreceptor rescue was restricted to areas in proximity to the injection sites. We developed a minimally-invasive surgical platform for drug and cell delivery in a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. The novel system is comprised of a syringe with a blunt-tipped needle and an adjustable separator. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted in eyes of RCS rats and NZW rabbits through a longitudinal triangular scleral incision. No immunosuppressants were used. Retinal function was determined by electroretinogram analysis and retinal structure was determined by histological analysis and OCT. Transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. In RCS rats, cell transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration across the entire retina and significantly enhanced retinal functions. No retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhages were observed in rabbits following transplantation. This novel platform opens a new avenue for drug and cell delivery, placing the transplanted cells in close proximity to the damaged RPE and retina as a thin layer, across the subretina and thereby slowing down cell death and photoreceptor degeneration, without retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhage. This new transplantation system may increase the therapeutic effect of other cell-based therapies and therapeutic agents. This study is expected to directly lead to phase I/II clinical trials for autologous hBM-MSCs transplantation in retinal degeneration patients.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 March 2015
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 9307, Ophthalmic Technologies XXV, 93071X (20 March 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2078972
Show Author Affiliations
Ygal Rotenstreich, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger Eye Institute, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
Adi Tzameret, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger Eye Institute, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
Sapir E. Kalish, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger Eye Institute, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
Michael Belkin, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger Eye Institute, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
Amilia Meir, Sheba Medical Ctr. (Israel)
Avraham J. Treves, Sheba Medical Ctr. (Israel)
Arnon Nagler, Sheba Medical Ctr. (Israel)
Ifat Sher, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger Eye Institute, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9307:
Ophthalmic Technologies XXV
Fabrice Manns; Per G. Söderberg; Arthur Ho, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top