Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Analysis system for characterisation of simple, low-cost microfluidic components
Author(s): Suzanne Smith; Thegaran Naidoo; Zandile Nxumalo; Kevin Land; Emlyn Davies; Louis Fourie; Philip Marais; Pieter Roux
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

There is an inherent trade-off between cost and operational integrity of microfluidic components, especially when intended for use in point-of-care devices. We present an analysis system developed to characterise microfluidic components for performing blood cell counting, enabling the balance between function and cost to be established quantitatively. Microfluidic components for sample and reagent introduction, mixing and dispensing of fluids were investigated. A simple inlet port plugging mechanism is used to introduce and dispense a sample of blood, while a reagent is released into the microfluidic system through compression and bursting of a blister pack. Mixing and dispensing of the sample and reagent are facilitated via air actuation. For these microfluidic components to be implemented successfully, a number of aspects need to be characterised for development of an integrated point-of-care device design. The functional components were measured using a microfluidic component analysis system established in-house. Experiments were carried out to determine: 1. the force and speed requirements for sample inlet port plugging and blister pack compression and release using two linear actuators and load cells for plugging the inlet port, compressing the blister pack, and subsequently measuring the resulting forces exerted, 2. the accuracy and repeatability of total volumes of sample and reagent dispensed, and 3. the degree of mixing and dispensing uniformity of the sample and reagent for cell counting analysis. A programmable syringe pump was used for air actuation to facilitate mixing and dispensing of the sample and reagent. Two high speed cameras formed part of the analysis system and allowed for visualisation of the fluidic operations within the microfluidic device. Additional quantitative measures such as microscopy were also used to assess mixing and dilution accuracy, as well as uniformity of fluid dispensing - all of which are important requirements towards the successful implementation of a blood cell counting system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 June 2014
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 9257, Sensors, MEMS and Electro-Optical Systems, 92570J (23 June 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2065110
Show Author Affiliations
Suzanne Smith, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Thegaran Naidoo, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Zandile Nxumalo, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Kevin Land, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Emlyn Davies, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Louis Fourie, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Philip Marais, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)
Pieter Roux, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9257:
Sensors, MEMS and Electro-Optical Systems
Monuko du Plessis, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top