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Proceedings Paper

Pseudointrinsic probes for generating spectrally enhanced proteins and nucleic acids
Author(s): J. B. Alexander Ross; Carol A. Hasselbacher; Elena Rusinova; D. F. Senear; William R. Laws
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Paper Abstract

The convergence of methods and techniques in biological fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular biotechnology have resulted in improved strategies for labelling specific sites in proteins and nucleic acids. Extrinsic probes, such as dansyl or fluorescein, are commonly used for labelling of proteins and nucleic acids. Introduction of extrinsic probes by covalent modification, however, is always accompanied by the potential risk of altering structure and/or function of these macromolecules. As an alternative to the use of extrinsic probes, there has been a developing interest in the use of tryptophan or nucleic acid base analogs as pseudo intrinsic probes in proteins and nucleic acids. The objective is to generate spectrally enhanced proteins or nucleic acids that are labelled at specific sites and that retain most or all of the functional features of the non-enhanced parent macromolecule. Base analogs with desirable spectroscopic properties can be introduced by direct synthesis. Tryptophan analogs with desirable spectroscopic properties can be introduced into proteins by expression in vivo or in vitro, or by direct chemical synthesis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 April 1995
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 2386, Ultrasensitive Instrumentation for DNA Sequencing and Biochemical Diagnostics, (3 April 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.206034
Show Author Affiliations
J. B. Alexander Ross, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
Carol A. Hasselbacher, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
Elena Rusinova, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
D. F. Senear, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)
William R. Laws, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2386:
Ultrasensitive Instrumentation for DNA Sequencing and Biochemical Diagnostics
Gerald E. Cohn; Jeremy M. Lerner; Kevin J. Liddane; Alexander Scheeline; Steven A. Soper, Editor(s)

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