Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Fiber optical cable and connector system (FOCCoS) for PFS/ Subaru
Author(s): Antonio Cesar de Oliveira; Lígia Souza de Oliveira; Marcio V. de Arruda; Lucas Souza Marrara; Leandro H. dos Santos; Décio Ferreira; Jesulino B. dos Santos; Josimar A. Rosa; Orlando V. Junior; Jeferson M. Pereira; Bruno Castilho; Clemens Gneiding; Laerte S. Junior; Claudia M. de Oliveira; James Gunn; Akitoshi Ueda; Naruhisa Takato; Atsushi Shimono; Hajime Sugai; Hiroshi Karoji; Masahiko Kimura; Naoyuki Tamura; Shiang-Yu Wang; Graham Murray; David Le Mignant; Fabrice Madec; Marc Jaquet; Sebastien Vives; Charlie Fisher; David Braun; Mark Schwochert; Daniel J. Reiley
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

FOCCoS, "Fiber Optical Cable and Connector System" has the main function of capturing the direct light from the focal plane of Subaru Telescope using optical fibers, each one with a microlens in its tip, and conducting this light through a route containing connectors to a set of four spectrographs. The optical fiber cable is divided in 3 different segments called Cable A, Cable B and Cable C. Multi-fibers connectors assure precise connection among all optical fibers of the segments, providing flexibility for instrument changes. To assure strong and accurate connection, these sets are arranged inside two types of assemblies: the Tower Connector, for connection between Cable C and Cable B; and the Gang Connector, for connection between Cable B and Cable A. Throughput tests were made to evaluate the efficiency of the connections. A lifetime test connection is in progress. Cable C is installed inside the PFI, Prime Focus Instrument, where each fiber tip with a microlens is bonded to the end of the shaft of a 2-stage piezo-electric rotatory motor positioner; this assembly allows each fiber to be placed anywhere within its patrol region, which is 9.5mm diameter.. Each positioner uses a fiber arm to support the ferrule, the microlens, and the optical fiber. 2400 of these assemblies are arranged on a motor bench plate in a hexagonal-closed-packed disposition. All optical fibers from Cable C, protected by tubes, pass through the motors’ bench plate, three modular plates and a strain relief box, terminating at the Tower Connector. Cable B is permanently installed at Subaru Telescope structure, as a link between Cable C and Cable A. This cable B starts at the Tower Connector device, placed on a lateral structure of the telescope, and terminates at the Gang Connector device. Cable B will be routed to minimize the compression, torsion and bending caused by the cable weight and telescope motion. In the spectrograph room, Cable A starts at the Gang Connector, crosses a distribution box and terminates in a slit device. Each slit device receives approximately 600 optical fibers, linearly arrayed in a curve for better orientation of the light to the spectrograph collimator mirror. Four sets of Gang Connectors, distribution boxes and Slit devices complete one Cable A. This paper will review the general design of the FOCCoS subsystem, methods used to manufacture the involved devices, and the needed tests results to evaluate the total efficiency of the set.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2014
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 9151, Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation, 91514G (28 July 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2056888
Show Author Affiliations
Antonio Cesar de Oliveira, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Lígia Souza de Oliveira, Oliveira Instrumentação Óptica Ltd. (Brazil)
Marcio V. de Arruda, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Lucas Souza Marrara, Oliveira Instrumentação Óptica Ltd. (Brazil)
Leandro H. dos Santos, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Décio Ferreira, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Jesulino B. dos Santos, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Josimar A. Rosa, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Orlando V. Junior, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Jeferson M. Pereira, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Bruno Castilho, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Clemens Gneiding, Lab. Nacional de Astrofísica (Brazil)
Laerte S. Junior, Univ. de São Paulo (Brazil)
Claudia M. de Oliveira, Univ. de São Paulo (Brazil)
James Gunn, Princeton Univ. (United States)
Akitoshi Ueda, Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States)
Naruhisa Takato, Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States)
Atsushi Shimono, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Hajime Sugai, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Hiroshi Karoji, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Masahiko Kimura, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Naoyuki Tamura, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Shiang-Yu Wang, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Taiwan)
Graham Murray, Durham Univ. (United Kingdom)
David Le Mignant, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille-Provence (France)
Fabrice Madec, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille-Provence (France)
Marc Jaquet, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille-Provence (France)
Sebastien Vives, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille-Provence (France)
Charlie Fisher, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
David Braun, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Mark Schwochert, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Daniel J. Reiley, Caltech Optical Observatories (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9151:
Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation
Ramón Navarro; Colin R. Cunningham; Allison A. Barto, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top