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Proceedings Paper

Gemini planet imager observational calibrations VI: photometric and spectroscopic calibration for the integral field spectrograph
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Paper Abstract

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument for the Gemini Observatory designed to provide direct detection and characterization of planets and debris disks around stars in the solar neighborhood. In addition to its extreme adaptive optics and coronagraphic systems which give access to high angular resolution and high-contrast imaging capabilities, GPI contains an integral field spectrograph providing low resolution spectroscopy across five bands between 0.95 and 2.5 μm. This paper describes the sequence of processing steps required for the spectro-photometric calibration of GPI science data, and the necessary calibration files. Based on calibration observations of the white dwarf HD 8049 B we estimate that the systematic error in spectra extracted from GPI observations is less than 5%. The flux ratio of the occulted star and fiducial satellite spots within coronagraphic GPI observations, required to estimate the magnitude difference between a target and any resolved companions, was measured in the H-band to be ∆m = 9.23 ± 0.06 in laboratory measurements and ∆m = 9.39 ± 0.11 using on-sky observations. Laboratory measurements for the Y, J , K1 and K2 filters are also presented. The total throughput of GPI, Gemini South and the atmosphere of the Earth was also measured in each photometric passband, with a typical throughput in H-band of 18% in the non-coronagraphic mode, with some variation observed over the six-month period for which observations were available. We also report ongoing development and improvement of the data cube extraction algorithm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2014
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 9147, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V, 914785 (28 July 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2056732
Show Author Affiliations
Jérôme Maire, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Patrick J. Ingraham, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford Univ. (United States)
Rob J. De Rosa, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom)
Marshall D. Perrin, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Abhijith Rajan, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
Dmitry Savransky, Cornell Univ. (United States)
Jason J. Wang, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Jean-Baptiste Ruffio, SETI Institute (United States)
Schuyler G. Wolff, Johns Hopkins Univ. (Canada)
Jeffrey K. Chilcote, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
René Doyon, Univ. de Montréal (Canada)
James R. Graham, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Alexandra Z. Greenbaum, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Quinn M. Konopacky, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
James E. Larkin, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Bruce A. Macintosh, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford Univ. (United States)
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Christian Marois, NRC - Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (Canada)
Max Millar-Blanchaer, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Jennifer Patience, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
Laurent A. Pueyo, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Anand Sivaramakrishnan, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Sandrine J. Thomas, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Jason L. Weiss, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9147:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V
Suzanne K. Ramsay; Ian S. McLean; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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