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Proceedings Paper

Coolers development for the ATHENA X-IFU cryogenic chain
Author(s): L. Duband; I. Charles; J.-M. Duval
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Paper Abstract

The hot and energetic universe has been selected by ESA as the science theme for the L2 mission with a planned launch in 2028. The Athena mission is one the potential mission concept for the next X-rays generation satellite. One of the instruments of this mission is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) which provides spatially resolved high resolution spectroscopy. This low temperature instrument requires high detector sensitivity that can only be achieved using 50 mK cooling. To obtain this temperature level, a careful design of the cryostat and of the cooling chain comprising different stages in cascade is needed. CEA has undertaken development in various areas to contribute to this cryochain including pulse tube coolers and sub-Kelvin coolers. This paper will describe the status of our different cooler developments. High temperature two stage pulse tube can be used for thermal shields cooling, 15 K pulse tube cooler for 2 K JT precooling and 4 K pulse tube cooler for a potential direct cooling of the sub-kelvin cooler. The 50 mK temperature is achieved using a sub-kelvin cooler comprising an adsorption cooler linked to an ADR stage. This elegant solution gives way to a light, compact and reliable cooler which has been validated in the SPICA/SAFARI project. Modified solutions are also under study to accommodate alternative design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 July 2014
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 9144, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 91445W (24 July 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2056383
Show Author Affiliations
L. Duband, INAC, CEA, Univ. Grenoble Alpes (France)
I. Charles, INAC, CEA, Univ. Grenoble Alpes (France)
J.-M. Duval, INAC, CEA, Univ. Grenoble Alpes (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9144:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray
Tadayuki Takahashi; Jan-Willem A. den Herder; Mark Bautz, Editor(s)

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