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Proceedings Paper

Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope
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Paper Abstract

Chinese Antarctic Observatory has been listed as National large research infrastructure during twelfth five-year plan. Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope, one of two major facility of Chinese Antarctic Observatory, is a 2.5-meter optic/infrared telescope and will be built at the Chinese Antarctic Kunlun Station. It is intended to take advantage of the exceptional seeing conditions, as well as the low temperature reducing background for infrared observations. KDUST will adopt an innovative optical system, which can deliver very good image quality over a 2 square degree flat field of view. All of parts of it have been designed carefully to endure the extremely harsh environment. KDUST will be perched on a 14.5-meter-high tower to lift it above the turbulence layer. In this paper, preliminary design and key technology pre-research of KDUST will be introduced.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 July 2014
PDF: 17 pages
Proc. SPIE 9145, Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, 91450E (22 July 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2055768
Show Author Affiliations
Yongtian Zhu, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Chinese Ctr. for Antarctic Astronomy (China)
Lifan Wang, Purple Mountain Observatory (China)
Texas A&M Univ. (United States)
Xiangyan Yuan, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Bozhong Gu, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Xinnan Li, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Shihai Yang, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Xuefei Gong, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Fujia Du, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Yongjun Qi, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Lingzhe Xu, National Astronomical Observatories, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)
Key Lab. of Astronomical Optics & Technology, Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9145:
Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V
Larry M. Stepp; Roberto Gilmozzi; Helen J. Hall, Editor(s)

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