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Proceedings Paper

CARMENES ultra-stable cooling system: very promising results
Author(s): E. Mirabet; P. Carvas; J.-L. Lizon; S. Becerril; E. Rodríguez; M. Abril; M. C. Cárdenas; R. Morales; D. Pérez; M. A. Sánchez Carrasco; P. J. Amado; W. Seifert; A. Quirrenbach; J. A. Caballero; I. Ribas; A. Reiners; S. Dreizler
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Paper Abstract

CARMENES is a high resolution spectrograph to detect planets through the variation of radial velocity, destined for the Calar Alto Observatory in Almeria, Spain. The optical bench has a working temperature of 140K with a 24 hours stability of ±0,1K; goal ±0,01K. It is enclosed with a radiation shield actively cooled with thermalized nitrogen gas that flows through strategically positioned heat exchangers to remove its radiative load. The cooling system has an external preparation unit (N2GPU), which provides the nitrogen gas through actively vaporizing liquid nitrogen with heating resistances and a three stage circuit flow, each one controlled by an independent PID. Since CARMENES is still in the construction phase, a dedicated test facility has been built in order to simulate the instrument and correctly establish the N2GPU parameters. Furthermore, the test facility allows a wide range of configurations set-ups, which enables a full characterization of the N2GPU and the cooling system. The N2GPU has been designed to offer a wide temperature range of thermally stabilized nitrogen gas flow, which apart from CARMENES could also be used to provide ultra-high thermal stability in other cryogenic instruments. The present paper shows the testing of the cooling performance, the hardware used and the very promising results obtained.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 August 2014
PDF: 16 pages
Proc. SPIE 9151, Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation, 91513Y (7 August 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2055570
Show Author Affiliations
E. Mirabet, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
P. Carvas, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
J.-L. Lizon, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
S. Becerril, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
E. Rodríguez, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
M. Abril, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
M. C. Cárdenas, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
R. Morales, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
D. Pérez, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
M. A. Sánchez Carrasco, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
P. J. Amado, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Spain)
W. Seifert, Landessternwarte Heidelberg (Germany)
A. Quirrenbach, Landessternwarte Heidelberg (Germany)
J. A. Caballero, Ctr. de Astrobiología (Spain)
I. Ribas, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain)
A. Reiners, Institut für Astrophysik Göttingen (Germany)
S. Dreizler, Institut für Astrophysik Göttingen (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9151:
Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation
Ramón Navarro; Colin R. Cunningham; Allison A. Barto, Editor(s)

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