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Proceedings Paper

Ultraviolet fluorescence identification of protein, DNA, and bacteria
Author(s): Philip J. Hargis; T. J. Sobering; Gary C. Tisone; John S. Wagner; Steve A. Young; R. J. Radloff
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Paper Abstract

Recent food poisoning incidents have highlighted the need for inexpensive instrumentation that can detect food pathogens. Instrumentation that detects the relatively strong ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence signal from the aromatic protein amino acids in bacteria could provide a solution to the problem of real-time pathogen measurements. The capabilities of UV fluorescence measurements have, however, been largely ignored because of the difficulty in identifying pathogens in the presence of interfering backgrounds. Implementation of fluorescence measurements thus requires methodologies that can distinguish fluorescence features associated with pathogens from those associated with proteins, harmless bacteria, skin, blood, hair follicles, pesticide residue, etc. We describe multispectral UV fluorescence measurements that demonstrate the feasibility of detecting and identifying protein, DNA, and bacteria using a relatively simple UV imaging fluorometer and a unique multivariate analysis algorithm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 February 1995
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 2366, Optical Instrumentation for Gas Emissions Monitoring and Atmospheric Measurements, (10 February 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.205554
Show Author Affiliations
Philip J. Hargis, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
T. J. Sobering, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
Gary C. Tisone, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
John S. Wagner, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
Steve A. Young, Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine (United States)
R. J. Radloff, Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2366:
Optical Instrumentation for Gas Emissions Monitoring and Atmospheric Measurements

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