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Proceedings Paper

Status of the JWST/NIRSpec instrument
Author(s): Stephan M. Birkmann; Pierre Ferruit; Catarina Alves de Oliveira; Torsten Böker; Guido De Marchi; Giovanna Giardino; Marco Sirianni; Martin Stuhlinger; Peter Jensen; Peter Rumler; Massimo Falcolini; Maurice B. J. te Plate; Giovanni Cresci; Bernhard Dorner; Ralf Ehrenwinkler; Xavier Gnata; Thomas Wettemann
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Paper Abstract

The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is one of the four instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018. NIRSpec has been designed and built by the European Space Agency (ESA) with Airbus Defense and Space Germany as prime contractor. The instrument covers the wavelength range from 0.6 to 5.3 micron and will be able to obtain spectra of more than 100 astronomical objects simultaneously by means of a configurable array of micro-shutters. It also features an integral field unit and a suite of slits for high contrast spectroscopy of individual objects. The extensive ground calibration campaign of NIRSpec was completed in Summer 2013, after which it was delivered to NASA for integration into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). We highlight the major results from the instrument level calibration campaign which demonstrated full compliance with all opto-mechanical performance requirements. In addition, we present the current status of the instrument, describe the ongoing preparations for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) test campaign to begin in June 2014, and briefly discuss plans for the pending exchange of the detector and micro-shutter assemblies following the first ISIM test cycle.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 August 2014
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 9143, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 914308 (2 August 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2054642
Show Author Affiliations
Stephan M. Birkmann, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Pierre Ferruit, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Catarina Alves de Oliveira, European Space Astronomy Ctr. (Spain)
Torsten Böker, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Guido De Marchi, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Giovanna Giardino, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Marco Sirianni, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Martin Stuhlinger, European Space Astronomy Ctr. (Spain)
Peter Jensen, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Peter Rumler, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Massimo Falcolini, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Maurice B. J. te Plate, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Giovanni Cresci, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy)
Bernhard Dorner, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Germany)
Ralf Ehrenwinkler, Airbus Defence and Space (Germany)
Xavier Gnata, Airbus Defence and Space (Germany)
Thomas Wettemann, Airbus Defence and Space (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9143:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave
Jacobus M. Oschmann; Mark Clampin; Giovanni G. Fazio; Howard A. MacEwen, Editor(s)

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