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Proceedings Paper

Single-crystal fiber optics: a review
Author(s): James A. Harrington
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Paper Abstract

Single-crystal (SC) fiber optics have been grown for many years for use as passive fibers for the delivery of IR laser radiation and as active fibers useful as minirod lasers. Most of the early work on SC fiber optics involved the growth of unclad sapphire fibers for the transmission of Er:YAG laser radiation at 2.94 μm. More recently there has been a renewed interest in rare-earth (RE) doped oxide crystal fibers for use as high power fiber lasers. By analogy with RE doped-bulk laser crystals it is expected that pure YAG and other crystalline SC fibers should be capable of transmitting extremely high laser energies. SC oxide fibers have some distinct advantages over conventional glass fibers including higher thermal conductivity and low stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) gain coefficients. The latter can limit the ultimate power output of glass fiber lasers. To date most of the investigators have used the technique of Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) to grow unclad SC fibers with diameters ranging from 30 to 350 μm and in lengths as long as 5 m. The loss for SC sapphire fibers at 2.94 μm has been measured as low as 0.3 dB/m. In this review we discuss the technique of LHPG, the various SC fiber optics that have been grown for both active and passive applications, and methods that may be used to clad the fibers.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2014
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8959, Solid State Lasers XXIII: Technology and Devices, 895902 (28 February 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2048212
Show Author Affiliations
James A. Harrington, Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8959:
Solid State Lasers XXIII: Technology and Devices
W. Andrew Clarkson; Ramesh K. Shori, Editor(s)

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