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Proceedings Paper

A two-dimensional iterative panel method and boundary layer model for bio-inspired multi-body wings
Author(s): Christopher J. Blower; Akash Dhruv; Adam M. Wickenheiser
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Paper Abstract

The increased use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) has created a continuous demand for improved flight capabilities and range of use. During the last decade, engineers have turned to bio-inspiration for new and innovative flow control methods for gust alleviation, maneuverability, and stability improvement using morphing aircraft wings. The bio-inspired wing design considered in this study mimics the flow manipulation techniques performed by birds to extend the operating envelope of UAVs through the installation of an array of feather-like panels across the airfoil’s upper and lower surfaces while replacing the trailing edge flap. Each flap has the ability to deflect into both the airfoil and the inbound airflow using hinge points with a single degree-of-freedom, situated at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the chord. The installation of the surface flaps offers configurations that enable advantageous maneuvers while alleviating gust disturbances. Due to the number of possible permutations available for the flap configurations, an iterative constant-strength doublet/source panel method has been developed with an integrated boundary layer model to calculate the pressure distribution and viscous drag over the wing’s surface. As a result, the lift, drag and moment coefficients for each airfoil configuration can be calculated. The flight coefficients of this numerical method are validated using experimental data from a low speed suction wind tunnel operating at a Reynolds Number 300,000. This method enables the aerodynamic assessment of a morphing wing profile to be performed accurately and efficiently in comparison to Computational Fluid Dynamics methods and experiments as discussed herein.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 March 2014
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 9055, Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2014, 90550V (8 March 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2046564
Show Author Affiliations
Christopher J. Blower, The George Washington Univ. (United States)
Akash Dhruv, The George Washington Univ. (United States)
Adam M. Wickenheiser, The George Washington Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9055:
Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2014
Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Editor(s)

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