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Proceedings Paper

Adaptive geodesic transform for segmentation of vertebrae on CT images
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Paper Abstract

Vertebral segmentation is a critical first step in any quantitative evaluation of vertebral pathology using CT images. This is especially challenging because bone marrow tissue has the same intensity profile as the muscle surrounding the bone. Thus simple methods such as thresholding or adaptive k-means fail to accurately segment vertebrae. While several other algorithms such as level sets may be used for segmentation any algorithm that is clinically deployable has to work in under a few seconds. To address these dual challenges we present here, a new algorithm based on the geodesic distance transform that is capable of segmenting the spinal vertebrae in under one second. To achieve this we extend the theory of the geodesic distance transforms proposed in1 to incorporate high level anatomical knowledge through adaptive weighting of image gradients. Such knowledge may be provided by the user directly or may be automatically generated by another algorithm. We incorporate information 'learnt' using a previously published machine learning algorithm2 to segment the L1 to L5 vertebrae. While we present a particular application here, the adaptive geodesic transform is a generic concept which can be applied to segmentation of other organs as well.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 March 2014
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 9035, Medical Imaging 2014: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, 903516 (18 March 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2043527
Show Author Affiliations
Bilwaj Gaonkar, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (United States)
Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
Liao Shu, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (United States)
Gerardo Hermosillo, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (United States)
Yiqiang Zhan, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9035:
Medical Imaging 2014: Computer-Aided Diagnosis
Stephen Aylward; Lubomir M. Hadjiiski, Editor(s)

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