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Proceedings Paper

Collaborative learning: migration of distributed interactive simulation to educational applications
Author(s): Michael A. Companion; Ronald W. Tarr; John W. Jacobs; J. Michael Moshell
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Paper Abstract

The educational system within the United States has historically emphasized learning as an individual accomplishment. Working effectively with others is a skill that has been omitted from the traditional educational setting even though this reflects the modern workplace. A collaborative learning environment is one of the educational technologies being developed to address the requirement for imparting group skills within the educational system. It is a form of networked learning environment that permits students to work together on authentic learning tasks. Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) is a technology develop by the DoD to facilitate the integration and use of multiple simulations and simulators in a distributed collaborative computing environment. DIS can enhance collaborative learning environments in future educational applications by introducing authentic simulations of real world events into the learning experience.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 April 1995
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 10280, Distributed Interactive Simulation Systems for Simulation and Training in the Aerospace Environment: A Critical Review, 102800C (19 April 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.204218
Show Author Affiliations
Michael A. Companion, Univ. of Central Florida (United States)
Ronald W. Tarr, Univ. of Central Florida (United States)
John W. Jacobs, Univ. of Central Florida (United States)
J. Michael Moshell, Univ. of Central Florida (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10280:
Distributed Interactive Simulation Systems for Simulation and Training in the Aerospace Environment: A Critical Review
Thomas L. Clarke, Editor(s)

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