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Proceedings Paper

Nuclear power and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA): past through future applications
Author(s): M. G. Stamatelatos; P. Moieni; C. J. Everline
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Paper Abstract

Nuclear power reactor safety in the United States is about to enter a new era -- an era of risk- based management and risk-based regulation. First, there was the age of `prescribed safety assessment,' during which a series of design-basis accidents in eight categories of severity, or classes, were postulated and analyzed. Toward the end of that era, it was recognized that `Class 9,' or `beyond design basis,' accidents would need special attention because of the potentially severe health and financial consequences of these accidents. The accident at Three Mile Island showed that sequences of low-consequence, high-frequency events and human errors can be much more risk dominant than the Class 9 accidents. A different form of safety assessment, PSA, emerged and began to gain ground against the deterministic safety establishment. Eventually, this led to the current regulatory requirements for individual plant examinations (IPEs). The IPEs can serve as a basis for risk-based regulation and management, a concept that may ultimately transform the U.S. regulatory process from its traditional deterministic foundations to a process predicated upon PSA. Beyond the possibility of a regulatory environment predicated upon PSA lies the possibility of using PSA as the foundation for managing daily nuclear power plant operations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 March 1995
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 2339, International Conference on Neutrons and Their Applications, (3 March 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.204145
Show Author Affiliations
M. G. Stamatelatos, Scientech, Inc. (United States)
P. Moieni, Scientech, Inc. (United States)
C. J. Everline, Scientech, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2339:
International Conference on Neutrons and Their Applications
George Vourvopoulos; Themis Paradellis, Editor(s)

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