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Proceedings Paper

Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera
Author(s): Jianliang Xiao; Young Min Song; Yizhu Xie; Viktor Malyarchuk; Inhwa Jung; Ki-Joong Choi; Zhuangjian Liu; Hyunsung Park; Chaofeng Lu; Rak-Hwan Kim; Rui Li; Kenneth B. Crozier; Yonggang Huang; John A. Rogers
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Paper Abstract

Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 March 2014
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8958, Bioinspired, Biointegrated, Bioengineered Photonic Devices II, 89580A (3 March 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2041112
Show Author Affiliations
Jianliang Xiao, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States)
Young Min Song, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States)
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Yizhu Xie, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States)
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Viktor Malyarchuk, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States)
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Inhwa Jung, Kyung Hee Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
Ki-Joong Choi, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Zhuangjian Liu, A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing (Singapore)
Hyunsung Park, Harvard Univ. (United States)
Chaofeng Lu, Zhejiang Univ. (China)
Northwestern Univ. (United States)
Rak-Hwan Kim, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States)
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Rui Li, Northwestern Univ. (United States)
Dalian Univ. of Technology (China)
Kenneth B. Crozier, Harvard Univ. (United States)
Yonggang Huang, Northwestern Univ. (United States)
John A. Rogers, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States)
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8958:
Bioinspired, Biointegrated, Bioengineered Photonic Devices II
Luke P. Lee; John A. Rogers; Seok Hyun Andy Yun, Editor(s)

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