Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Effects of photodynamic treatment on contraction of collagen gels by cultured human dermal fibroblasts
Author(s): Rolf-Markus Szeimies; Anja Katrin Bosserhoff; Ruediger Hein; Armin Dylla; Wolfgang Baeumler; Michael Landthaler
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Usually cell viability (CV) after PDT is observed in methods based on metabolic parameters (MTT assay) or dye exclusion tests [trypan-blue (TBT)]. Although these tests are accurate in the determination of cell death, functional impairment can not be easily detected. We examined the effects of PDT on human dermal fibroblasts (DF) to determine whether collagen gel contraction (CGC) can be inhibited and whether it correlates well with CV as measured by the TBT. Five-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) (1, 5, 10 (mu) g/ml) was added to DF cultured in dishes. Twenty-four hours later, a collagen type I solution was added and irradiation with a tunable dye laser (630 nm, 100 mW/cm2, 80 J/cm2) was performed. After 24 h, diameters of contracted gels and TBT were measured. As a result, PDT with 5-ALA inhibited CGC and affected CV as a function of dose level. Consequently, CGC data allows a better estimation of the threshold 5-ALA dose affecting the cells.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 March 1995
PDF: 3 pages
Proc. SPIE 2371, 5th International Photodynamic Association Biennial Meeting, (1 March 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.203394
Show Author Affiliations
Rolf-Markus Szeimies, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)
Anja Katrin Bosserhoff, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)
Ruediger Hein, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)
Armin Dylla, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)
Wolfgang Baeumler, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)
Michael Landthaler, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2371:
5th International Photodynamic Association Biennial Meeting
Denis A. Cortese, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top