Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper • Open Access

The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space
Author(s): M. Schoeberl; R. Dickerson; B. T. Marshall; M. McHugh; C. Fish; H. Bloom

Paper Abstract

Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols – two of the most important elements in the earth’s radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth’s surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 September 2013
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 8866, Earth Observing Systems XVIII, 886602 (23 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2030907
Show Author Affiliations
M. Schoeberl, Science & Technology Corp. (United States)
R. Dickerson, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)
B. T. Marshall, GATS, Inc. (United States)
M. McHugh, GATS, Inc. (United States)
C. Fish, Space Dynamics Lab., Utah State Univ. Research Foundation (United States)
H. Bloom, Science & Technology Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8866:
Earth Observing Systems XVIII
James J. Butler; Xiaoxiong (Jack) Xiong; Xingfa Gu, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top