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Proceedings Paper

Temporal variability of aerosol properties during TCAP: impact on radiative forcing
Author(s): Evgueni Kassianov; James Barnard; Mikhail Pekour; Larry K. Berg; Jerome Fast; Joseph Michalsky; Kathy Lantz; Gary Hodges
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Paper Abstract

Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 October 2013
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 8890, Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere XVIII; and Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems XVI, 88900O (17 October 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2029355
Show Author Affiliations
Evgueni Kassianov, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
James Barnard, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Mikhail Pekour, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Larry K. Berg, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Jerome Fast, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Joseph Michalsky, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (United States)
Kathy Lantz, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environment Sciences, Univ. of Colorado (United States)
Gary Hodges, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environment Sciences, Univ. of Colorado (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8890:
Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere XVIII; and Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems XVI
Adolfo Comeron; Karin Stein; John D. Gonglewski; Evgueni I. Kassianov; Klaus Schäfer, Editor(s)

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