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Proceedings Paper

Desorption of nanoparticle assemblies via the introduction of fuel DNA and subsequent heat treatment
Author(s): Soon Hock Ng; Thibaut Thai; Udo Bach
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Paper Abstract

The control over the self-assembly characteristics of nanoparticles is vital for bottom up techniques. The use of thiolated ligands when working with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is common since thiols bond strongly with gold. Generally a thiol displacement reaction is used to desorb AuNPs from a surface. This involves the introduction of a thiol containing ligand which displaces the gold surfaces ligands. Hence, using this method, it is not possible to desorb particles without interfering with existing surface ligands. DNA-directed self-assembly is commonly used to immobilize AuNPs onto gold substrates since a major advantage is its high selectivity. Here, the surface is modified with a thiol terminated DNA of sequence a while the particle is modified with the complementary sequence á. When combined, the particles self-assemble onto the substrate. During desorption, it can be beneficial for the DNA to remain on the gold surfaces in order for them to retain their selective character. We investigate a method that is able to desorb nanoparticles without destroying the thiol-gold bond between gold the nanoparticle and particle DNA. Combining fuel DNA, so-called for its use in molecular machines, with a thermal cycle6 resulted in 93% particle desorption as can be seen in Figure 1. Particles were first functionalised with DNA of sequence b0 and a planar gold coated surface was functionalisedwith DNA of sequence á. A linker of sequence c-b-a was then hybridised with the substrate DNA, Figure 2(ii).

Paper Details

Date Published:
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Proc. SPIE 8793, Fourth International Conference on Smart Materials and Nanotechnology in Engineering, 879329; doi: 10.1117/12.2026739
Show Author Affiliations
Soon Hock Ng, Monash University (Australia)
Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication (Australia)
Thibaut Thai, Monash University (Australia)
Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication (Australia)
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) (Australia)
Udo Bach, Monash University (Australia)
Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication (Australia)
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8793:
Fourth International Conference on Smart Materials and Nanotechnology in Engineering
Jayantha A. Epaarachchi; Alan Kin-tak Lau; Jinsong Leng, Editor(s)

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