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Proceedings Paper

Conceptual opto-mechanical design of a NIR imaging spectrometer for the Korean NEXTSat-1 mission
Author(s): Bongkon Moon; Kwijong Park; Sung-Joon Park; Woong-Seob Jeong; Dae-Hee Lee; Youngsik Park; Uk-Won Nam; Wonyong Han; Jeonghyun Pyo; Wonki Park; Il-Joong Kim; Duk-Hang Lee; Jang-Soo Chae; Goo-Hwan Shin; Norihide Takeyama; Akito Enokuchi
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Paper Abstract

Since the end of 2012, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has been developed the Near-infrared Imaging Spectrometer for Star formation history (NISS), which is a payload of the Korean next small satellite 1 (NEXTSat-1) and will be launched in 2017. NISS has a cryogenic system, which will be cooled down to around 200K by a radiation cooling in space. NISS is an off-axis catadioptric telescope with 150mm aperture diameter and F-number 3.5, which covers the observation wavelengths from 0.95-3.8μm by using the linear variable filter (LVF) for the near infrared spectroscopy. The entire field of view is 2deg x 2deg with 7arcsec pixel scale. Optics consists of two parabolic primary and secondary mirrors and re-imaging lenses having 8 elements. The main requirement for the optical performance is that the RMS spot diameters for whole fields are smaller than the detector pixel, 18μm. Two LVFs will be used for 0.9- 1.9μm and 1.9-3.8μm, whose FWHM is more than 2%. We will use the gold-coated aluminum mirrors and employ the HgCdTe 1024x1024 detector made by Teledyne. This paper presents the conceptual opto-mechanical design of NISS.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 September 2013
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8860, UV/Optical/IR Space Telescopes and Instruments: Innovative Technologies and Concepts VI, 886010 (26 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2024796
Show Author Affiliations
Bongkon Moon, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Kwijong Park, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Sung-Joon Park, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Woong-Seob Jeong, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Dae-Hee Lee, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Youngsik Park, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Uk-Won Nam, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Wonyong Han, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Jeonghyun Pyo, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Wonki Park, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Il-Joong Kim, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Duk-Hang Lee, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Jang-Soo Chae, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Goo-Hwan Shin, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Norihide Takeyama, Genesia Corp. (Japan)
Akito Enokuchi, Genesia Corp. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8860:
UV/Optical/IR Space Telescopes and Instruments: Innovative Technologies and Concepts VI
Howard A. MacEwen; James B. Breckinridge, Editor(s)

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