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Proceedings Paper

Electric field conjugation with the project 1640 coronagraph
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Paper Abstract

The Project 1640 instrument on the 200-inch Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory is a coronagraphic instru- ment with an integral eld spectrograph at the back end, designed to nd young, self-luminous planets around nearby stars. To reach the necessary contrast for this, the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system corrects for fast atmospheric speckles, while CAL, a phase-shifting interferometer in a Mach-Zehnder con guration, measures the quasistatic components of the complex electric eld in the pupil plane following the coronagraphic stop. Two additional sensors measure and control low-order modes. These eld measurements may then be combined with a system model and data taken separately using a white-light source internal to the AO system to correct for both phase and amplitude aberrations. Here, we discuss and demonstrate the procedure to maintain a half-plane dark hole in the image plane while the spectrograph is taking data, including initial on-sky performance.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 September 2013
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8864, Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets VI, 88640K (26 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2024635
Show Author Affiliations
Eric Cady, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Christoph Baranec, California Institute of Technology (United States)
Charles Beichman, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
California Institute of Technology (United States)
NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (United States)
Douglas Brenner, American Museum of Natural History (United States)
Rick Burruss, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Justin Crepp, Notre Dame Univ. (United States)
Richard Dekany, California Institute of Technology (United States)
David Hale, California Institute of Technology (United States)
Lynne Hillenbrand, California Institute of Technology (United States)
Sasha Hinkley, California Institute of Technology (United States)
E. Robert Ligon, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Thomas Lockhart, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Ben Oppenheimer, American Museum of Natural History (United States)
Ian Parry, Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)
Laurent Pueyo, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Emily Rice, American Museum of Natural History (United States)
College of Staten Island (United States)
Lewis C. Roberts, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Jennifer Roberts, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Michael Shao, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Anand Sivaramakrishnan, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Remi Soummer, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Hong Tang, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Tuan Truong, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Gautam Vasisht, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Fred Vescelus, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
J. Kent Wallace, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Chengxing Zhai, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Neil Zimmerman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8864:
Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets VI
Stuart Shaklan, Editor(s)

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