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Proceedings Paper

Precision near-infrared radial velocity instrumentation II: noncircular core fiber scrambler
Author(s): Peter P. Plavchan; M. Bottom; P. Gao; J. K. Wallace; B. Mennesson; D. Ciardi; S. Crawford; S. Lin; C. Beichman; C. Brinkworth; J. Johnson; C. Davison; R. White; G. Anglada-Escude; K. von Braun; G. Vasisht; L. Prato; S. Kane; A. Tanner; B. Walp; S. Mills
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Paper Abstract

We have built and commissioned a prototype agitated non-circular core ber scrambler for precision spectroscopic radial velocity measurements in the near-infrared H band. We have collected the rst on-sky performance and modal noise tests of these novel bers in the near-infrared at H and K bands using the CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF). We discuss the design behind our novel reverse injection of a red laser for co-alignment of star-light with the ber tip via a corneWe have built and commissioned a prototype agitated non-circular core fiber scrambler for precision spectroscopic radial velocity measurements in the near-infrared H band. We have collected the first on-sky performance and modal noise tests of these novel fibers in the near-infrared at H and K bands using the CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF). We discuss the design behind our novel reverse injection of a red laser for co-alignment of star-light with the fiber tip via a corner cube and visible camera. We summarize the practical details involved in the construction of the fiber scrambler, and the mechanical agitation of the fiber at the telescope. We present radial velocity measurements of a bright standard star taken with and without the fiber scrambler to quantify the relative improvement in the obtainable blaze function stability, the line spread function stability, and the resulting radial velocity precision. We assess the feasibility of applying this illumination stabilization technique to the next generation of near-infrared spectrographs such as iSHELL on IRTF and an upgraded NIRSPEC at Keck. Our results may also be applied in the visible for smaller core diameter fibers where Fiber modal noise is a significant factor, such as behind an adaptive optics system or on a small < 1 meter class telescope such as is being pursued by the MINERVA and LCOGT collaborations.r cube and visible camera. We summarize the practical details involved in the construction of the ber scrambler, and the mechanical agitation of the ber at the telescope. We present radial velocity measurements of a bright standard star taken with and without the ber scrambler to quantify the relative improvement in the obtainable blaze function stability, the line spread function stability, and the resulting radial velocity precision. We assess the feasibility of applying this illumination stabilization technique to the next generation of near-infrared spectrographs such as iSHELL on IRTF and an upgraded NIRSPEC at Keck. Our results may also be applied in the visible for smaller core diameter bers where ber modal noise is a signi cant factor, such as behind an adaptive optics system or on a small < 1 meter class telescope such as is being pursued by the MINERVA and LCOGT collaborations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 September 2013
PDF: 18 pages
Proc. SPIE 8864, Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets VI, 88640G (26 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2023696
Show Author Affiliations
Peter P. Plavchan, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology (United States)
M. Bottom, California Institute of Technology (United States)
P. Gao, California Institute of Technology (United States)
J. K. Wallace, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
B. Mennesson, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
D. Ciardi, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology (United States)
S. Crawford, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
S. Lin, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
C. Beichman, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology (United States)
C. Brinkworth, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology (United States)
J. Johnson, Harvard Univ. (United States)
C. Davison, Georgia State Univ. (United States)
R. White, Georgia State Univ. (United States)
G. Anglada-Escude, Univ. Göttingen (Germany)
K. von Braun, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Germany)
G. Vasisht, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
L. Prato, Lowell Observatory (United States)
S. Kane, San Francisco State Univ. (United States)
A. Tanner, Mississippi State Univ. (United States)
B. Walp, SOFIA (United States)
S. Mills, The Univ. of Chicago (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8864:
Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets VI
Stuart Shaklan, Editor(s)

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