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Proceedings Paper

Integration of mirror design with suspension system using NASA's new mirror modeling software
Author(s): William R. Arnold; Ryan M. Bevan; H. Philip Stahl
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Paper Abstract

Advances in mirror fabrication are making very large space based telescopes possible. In many applications, only monolithic mirrors can meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass, and then available payload shroud sizes limit near term designs to 4 meter class mirrors. Practical 8 meter class and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds, if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors, lower mass and larger mirrors, present the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large of a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system handling both operational and launch loads. This paper shows how the suspension system and mirror blank need to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 September 2013
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 8836, Optomechanical Engineering 2013, 88360J (18 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2023512
Show Author Affiliations
William R. Arnold, Defense Acquisition, Inc. (United States)
Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (United States)
Ryan M. Bevan, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
H. Philip Stahl, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8836:
Optomechanical Engineering 2013
Alson E. Hatheway, Editor(s)

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