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Proceedings Paper

High energy density plasmas produced by x-ray and extreme ultraviolet lasers
Author(s): Andrew K. Rossall; Valentin Aslanyan; Greg J. Tallents
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Paper Abstract

A comprehensive simulation study is presented, examining the interaction of an EUV capillary discharge laser, operating at 46.9nm, within carbon at solid density. By incorporating a detailed model of photoionization, equation of state calculations, electronic term accounting and refractive index calculation into a pre-existing 2D radiative-hydrodynamic code POLLUX, target ablation and subsequent plasma expansion has been simulated for target material under intense (1011 W cm-2) EUV irradiation. Unique ablation based on direct photoionization by EUV photons creates solid density plasma with a temperature below 20eV. Plasma in this warm dense matter state is of particular interest to inertial con_nement fusion research. A reduction in focal spot size, due to a decrease in the di_raction limit, combined with increased target penetration allows for high-aspect ratio hole drilling and a signi_cant increase in the ejected target mass. This work outlines a comprehensive computational environment used to simulate the EUV/x-ray laser interaction within solid material and expanding plasma.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 September 2013
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8849, X-Ray Lasers and Coherent X-Ray Sources: Development and Applications X, 884912 (30 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2023232
Show Author Affiliations
Andrew K. Rossall, The Univ. of York (United Kingdom)
Valentin Aslanyan, The Univ. of York (United Kingdom)
Greg J. Tallents, The Univ. of York (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8849:
X-Ray Lasers and Coherent X-Ray Sources: Development and Applications X
Annie Klisnick; Carmen S. Menoni, Editor(s)

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