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Proceedings Paper

Semiconductor optical isolators for integrated optics
Author(s): Hiromasa Shimizu
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Paper Abstract

Semiconductor optical isolators for integrated optics are presented. The requirements and demands for semiconductor optical isolators which can be monolithically integrated with semiconductor lasers and waveguide are discussed. Fundamental theories of magneto-optic effect in optical waveguides including magnetic materials are shown and transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect is reported on ferromagnetic metal Fe, Co, and Fe50Co50 thin films. Based on the fundamental properties, design, fabrication, and characterization of semiconductor optical isolators based on nonreciprocal loss are shown. Transverse electric (TE-) and transverse magnetic (TM-) mode semiconductor optical isolators are reported in telecommunication wavelengths of 1.3 – 1.55 μm with (1) an optical isolation of 14.7 dB/mm in a TE mode semiconductor optical isolator, (2) amplifying characteristics in a TM mode semiconductor optical isolator, and (3) an optical isolation of 18.3 dB by using of nonreciprocal polarization rotation. Furthermore, monolithic integration of a semiconductor optical isolator with distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) is reported. Optical isolator performances are compared with those of previously reported waveguide optical isolators. Finally, future prospect and applications of semiconductor optical isolators are discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 September 2013
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 8813, Spintronics VI, 88132C (26 September 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2023189
Show Author Affiliations
Hiromasa Shimizu, Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8813:
Spintronics VI
Henri-Jean Drouhin; Jean-Eric Wegrowe; Manijeh Razeghi, Editor(s)

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