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Proceedings Paper

Laser speckle contrast reveals cerebral blood flow dynamics evoked by optogenetically controlled neuronal activity
Author(s): Nan Li; Nitish V. Thakor; Galit Pelled
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Paper Abstract

As a critical basis of functional brain imaging, neurovascular coupling describes the link between neuronal and hemodynamic changes. The majority of in vivo neurovascular coupling studies was performed by inducing sensory stimulation via afferent inputs. Unfortunately such an approach results in recruiting of multiple types of cells, which confounds the explanation of neuronal roles in stimulus evoked hemodynamic changes. Recently optogenetics has emerged to provide immediate control of neurons by exciting or inhibiting genetically engineered neurons expressing light sensitive proteins. However, there is a need for optical methods capable of imaging the concurrent hemodynamic changes. We utilize laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) to obtain high resolution display of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the vicinity of the targeted neural population. LSCI is a minimally invasive method for imaging CBF in microvessels through thinned skull, and produces images with high spatiotemporal resolution, wide field of view. In the integrated system light sources with different wavelengths and band-passing/blocking filters were used to allow simultaneous optical manipulation of neuronal activities and optical imaging of corresponding CBF. Experimental studies were carried out in a rodent model expressing channalrhodopsin (ChR2) in excitatory neurons in the somatosensory cortex (S1). The results demonstrated significant increases of CBF in response to ChR2 stimulation (exciting neuronal firing) comparable to the CBF response to contralateral forepaw stimulation. The approach promises to be an exciting minimally invasive method to study neurovascular coupling. The complete system provides a novel approach for broad neuroscience applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 March 2013
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8586, Optogenetics: Optical Methods for Cellular Control, 85860F (8 March 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2009830
Show Author Affiliations
Nan Li, Kennedy Krieger Institute (United States)
Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Nitish V. Thakor, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Galit Pelled, Kennedy Krieger Institute (United States)
Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8586:
Optogenetics: Optical Methods for Cellular Control
Samarendra K. Mohanty; Nitish V. Thakor, Editor(s)

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