Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Curved planar reformation and optimal path tracing (CROP) method for false positive reduction in computer-aided detection of pulmonary embolism in CTPA
Author(s): Chuan Zhou; Heang-Ping Chan; Yanhui Guo; Jun Wei; Aamer Chughtai; Lubomir M. Hadjiiski; Baskaran Sundaram; Smita Patel; Jean W. Kuriakose; Ella A. Kazerooni
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The curved planar reformation (CPR) method re-samples the vascular structures along the vessel centerline to generate longitudinal cross-section views. The CPR technique has been commonly used in coronary CTA workstation to facilitate radiologists’ visual assessment of coronary diseases, but has not yet been used for pulmonary vessel analysis in CTPA due to the complicated tree structures and the vast network of pulmonary vasculature. In this study, a new curved planar reformation and optimal path tracing (CROP) method was developed to facilitate feature extraction and false positive (FP) reduction and improve our PE detection system. PE candidates are first identified in the segmented pulmonary vessels at prescreening. Based on Dijkstra’s algorithm, the optimal path (OP) is traced from the pulmonary trunk bifurcation point to each PE candidate. The traced vessel is then straightened and a reformatted volume is generated using CPR. Eleven new features that characterize the intensity, gradient, and topology are extracted from the PE candidate in the CPR volume and combined with the previously developed 9 features to form a new feature space for FP classification. With IRB approval, CTPA of 59 PE cases were retrospectively collected from our patient files (UM set) and 69 PE cases from the PIOPED II data set with access permission. 595 and 800 PEs were manually marked by experienced radiologists as reference standard for the UM and PIOPED set, respectively. At a test sensitivity of 80%, the average FP rate was improved from 18.9 to 11.9 FPs/case with the new method for the PIOPED set when the UM set was used for training. The FP rate was improved from 22.6 to 14.2 FPs/case for the UM set when the PIOPED set was used for training. The improvement in the free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves was statistically significant (p<0.05) by JAFROC analysis, indicating that the new features extracted from the CROP method are useful for FP reduction.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 March 2013
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8670, Medical Imaging 2013: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, 867035 (29 March 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2008048
Show Author Affiliations
Chuan Zhou, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Heang-Ping Chan, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Yanhui Guo, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Jun Wei, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Aamer Chughtai, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Lubomir M. Hadjiiski, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Baskaran Sundaram, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Smita Patel, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Jean W. Kuriakose, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)
Ella A. Kazerooni, Univ. of Michigan Health System (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8670:
Medical Imaging 2013: Computer-Aided Diagnosis
Carol L. Novak; Stephen Aylward, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top