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Proceedings Paper

Measuring soft tissue material properties using stereovision and indentation: a proof-of-concept study
Author(s): Songbai Ji; Xiaoyao Fan; Alex Hartov; David W. Roberts; Keith D. Paulsen
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Paper Abstract

Accurate measurement of soft tissue material properties is critical for characterizing its biomechanical behaviors but can be challenging especially for the human brain. Recently, we have applied stereovision to track motion of the exposed cortical surface noninvasively for patients undergoing open skull neurosurgical operations. In this paper, we conduct a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the feasibility of the technique in measuring material properties of soft tissue in vivo using a tofu phantom. A block of soft tofu was prepared with black pepper randomly sprinkled on the top surface to provide texture to facilitate image-based displacement mapping. A disk-shaped indenter made of high-density tungsten was placed on the top surface to induce deformation through its weight. Stereoscopic images were acquired before and after indentation using a pair of stereovision cameras mounted on a surgical microscope with its optical path perpendicular to the imaging surface. Rectified left camera images obtained from stereovision reconstructions were then co-registered using optical flow motion tracking from which a 2D surface displacement field around the indenter disk was derived. A corresponding finite element model of the tofu was created subjected to the indenter weight and a hyperelastic material model was chosen to account for large deformation around the intender edges. By successively assigning different shear stiffness constant, computed tofu surface deformation was obtained, and an optimal shear stiffness was obtained that matched the model-derived surface displacements with those measured from the images. The resulting quasi-static, long-term shear stiffness for the tofu was 1.04 k Pa, similar to that reported in the literature. We show that the stereovision and free-weight indentation techniques coupled with an FE model are feasible for in vivo measurement of the human brain material properties, and it may also be feasible for other soft tissues.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 March 2013
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8671, Medical Imaging 2013: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling, 86710V (12 March 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2008041
Show Author Affiliations
Songbai Ji, Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth (United States)
Xiaoyao Fan, Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth (United States)
Alex Hartov, Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth (United States)
David W. Roberts, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ctr. (United States)
Keith D. Paulsen, Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth (United States)
Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8671:
Medical Imaging 2013: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling
David R. Holmes; Ziv R. Yaniv, Editor(s)

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