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Proceedings Paper

Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms
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Paper Abstract

Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p < .01) ranging between 0.0209 - 0.038% (reflectivity: %hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 April 2013
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 8585, Terahertz and Ultrashort Electromagnetic Pulses for Biomedical Applications, 85850W (24 April 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2001913
Show Author Affiliations
Neha Bajwa, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
James Garritano, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Yoon Kyung Lee, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Priyamvada Tewari, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Shijun Sung, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Ashkan Maccabi, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Bryan Nowroozi, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Meghedi Babakhanian, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Sajan Sanghvi, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Rahul Singh, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Warren Grundfest, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Zachary Taylor, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8585:
Terahertz and Ultrashort Electromagnetic Pulses for Biomedical Applications
Gerald J. Wilmink; Bennett L. Ibey, Editor(s)

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