Share Email Print

Proceedings Paper

Inexpensive driver for stereo videogame glasses
Author(s): Michael Pique; Anthony Coogan
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

We have adapted home videogame glasses from Sega as workstation stereo viewers. A small (4x7x9 cm.) box of electronics receives sync signals in parallel with the monitor (either separate ROB-Sync or composite video) and drives the glasses.The view is dimmer than with costlier shutters, there is more ghosting, and the user is feuered by the wires. But the glasses are so much cheaper than the full-screen shutters ($250 instead of about $10 000) that it is practical to provide the benefits of stereo to many more workstation users. We are using them with Sun TAAC-1 workstations; the interlaced video can also be recorded on ordinary NTSC videotape and played on television monitors.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 September 1990
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 1256, Stereoscopic Displays and Applications, (1 September 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.19901
Show Author Affiliations
Michael Pique, Scripps Clinic (United States)
Anthony Coogan, Magicbox Inc. (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1256:
Stereoscopic Displays and Applications
John O. Merritt; Scott S. Fisher, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top