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Proceedings Paper

Industrial application of sintered thick-film bulk photoconductive switching devices
Author(s): P. A. Howson; Rodney Miller; Y. Zhang
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Paper Abstract

A disadvantage of photoconductors, based on polycrystalline layers, is that when high electric fields are applied complex processes occur which are believed to be associated with thermal quenching of photoconductivity and inconsistencies in the physical properties of the layer, which lead to the formation of high electric field domains and subsequent 'hot spotting'. These effects have previously severely limited the ability of the material to cope with high electric fields and current densities. The authors have developed a process based on thick film technology, to produce sintered polycrystalline layers of solid solutions of CdSe, CdS and Cd.Te, which suppresses the formation of these high electric field domains, thus allowing the materials to be operated close to their practical electric field strengths. The photoconductivity, practical electric field strengths, time and temperature response of this materials is described. This material can be scaled to produce films ranging from a few square millimeters to several square meters in area. Thus making possible the industrial production of low cost bulk photoconductive switches, based on this form of the material, which will be capable of switching kA from kV sources.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 January 1995
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 2343, Optically Activated Switching IV, (4 January 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.198648
Show Author Affiliations
P. A. Howson, Univ. of Brighton (United Kingdom)
Rodney Miller, Univ. of Brighton (United Kingdom)
Y. Zhang, Univ. of Brighton (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2343:
Optically Activated Switching IV
William R. Donaldson, Editor(s)

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