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Proceedings Paper

Raman spectroscopy for cancer detection: instrument development and tissue diagnosis
Author(s): Ramasamy Manoharan; Yang Wang; Nada N. Boustany; James F. Brennan; Joseph J. Baraga; Ramachandra R. Dasari; Jacques Van Dam; Samuel Singer; Michael S. Feld
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Paper Abstract

Raman spectroscopy can provide quantitative molecular information about the biochemical composition of human tissues exhibiting various stages of disease. Fluorescence interference is ubiquitous in Raman spectra of biological samples excited with visible light. However, it can be avoided by using near-infrared (NIR) or ultraviolet (UV) excitation. We are exploring the potential of these methods for detecting precancerous/cancerous changes in human tissues. The NIR studies use 830 nm excitation from a Ti:sapphire laser. Raman signals are collected by an imaging spectrograph/deep-depletion CCD detection system. High quality tissue spectra can be obtained in a few seconds or less. The UV resonance Raman studies employ wavelengths below 300 nm for selective excitation of nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Excitation is provided by a frequency tripled/quadrupled mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, and Raman light is collected by a one meter spectrograph/UV-enhanced CCD detector. The two systems can be coupled to appropriate microscopes for extracting morphological and biochemical information at the cellular level, which is important for understanding the origin of the Raman spectra of bulk tissue. The results of the initial studies for cancer detection in various human tissues are reported here.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 December 1994
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 2328, Biomedical Optoelectronic Devices and Systems II, (22 December 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.197502
Show Author Affiliations
Ramasamy Manoharan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Yang Wang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Nada N. Boustany, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
James F. Brennan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Joseph J. Baraga, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Ramachandra R. Dasari, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Jacques Van Dam, Brigham and Women's Hospital (United States)
Samuel Singer, Brigham and Women's Hospital (United States)
Michael S. Feld, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2328:
Biomedical Optoelectronic Devices and Systems II
Nathan I. Croitoru; Norbert Kroo; Mitsunobu Miyagi; Riccardo Pratesi; Juergen M. Wolfrum, Editor(s)

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