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Proceedings Paper

Multiterabyte image storage and distribution for NASA's Hubble Space Telescope
Author(s): H. William Weller
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Paper Abstract

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing a permanent archive for the astronomical images that will be collected by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spacecraft. Initially this archive will hold 30 terabytes ofdata and is expected to grow to 68 terabytes. The stellar observations and the additional ancillary information needed to fully interpret the image data will be stored in a central facility, the HST Data Archive and Distribution Service (DADS). The HST DADS will collect and archive over three gigabytes of image data per day plus support data during the 15-year lifetime ofthe spacecraft. The archive will provide astronomical researchers around the world with electronic access to the images. Prior to the HST Program, researchers usually submitted written or verbal requests for data which was then mailed to them several weeks later. HST DADS will provide almost instantaneous access to all HST data. The HST DADS functionality, the modular architecture, and the key components of the system are presented herein. The HST DADS will support over 140 simultaneous users accessing the system via a variety of wide area network and local area network connections. An online catalog will be available to assist in identifying the desired set or sets of data from amongst the eventual 68 terabytes of online data. HST DADS will support retrieval and distribution ofthe data via a variety ofelectronic and physical media.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 August 1990
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 1248, Storage and Retrieval Systems and Applications, (1 August 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.19636
Show Author Affiliations
H. William Weller, Ford Aerospace Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1248:
Storage and Retrieval Systems and Applications
David H. Davies; Han-Ping D. Shieh, Editor(s)

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